Horse Joint Supplements Comparison and Review

Horse Joint SupplementsIf you are worried about the health and fitness of your horse, you may have considered supplementing her diet with horse joint supplements. According to the promises of these products, they can help prevent equine laminitis by keeping the joints healthier. Is that claim true? While more research does need to be done, some promising signs suggest they can have some positive effects.

Glucosamine for Joint Health

In studies of the components of horse joint supplements, glucosamine appears to be one of the most effective in improving joint health and, therefore, decreasing the risk of you ending up with a lame horse. Glucosamine stimulates the body to form other chemicals known as proteoglycan which is necessary for forming cartilage between the joints. Also, absorption rates in horses of the glucosamine seem good as well so they can actually use the glucosamine found in the equine joint supplements.

Another sign of success for this component are studies conducted in horses and humans. When compared to the results of a placebo, glucosamine did appear to improve joint movement in both species.

Also, glucosamine seems to have anti-inflammatory properties that can reduce pain and discomfort for a horse. Plus, the glucosamine does not cause any of the side effects associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, commonly known as NSAIDs.

CORTA-FLX Study

To find out how effective some of the horse joint supplements can be in dealing with lameness, a double blind research study was conducted using eight horses and a supplement called CORTA-FLX. All of those horses demonstrated various degrees of lameness. After using the supplement, the horses did begin to show some improvement, although they were not completely cured of the condition.

When it comes to making the decision about giving horse joint supplements as a way to treat or prevent lameness or a horse leg injury, the best idea is to talk to equine veterinarians about their suggestions. The evidence suggests glucosamine may be the best thing available but you should check with your vet to see what he or she thinks, too.