Tag Archives: ferret facts

Top 10 Fun Ferret Facts

Ferret Facts1. One of the top ferret facts is that these animals are related to badgers and weasels, and they enjoy companionship and socialization. Just like their relatives they can be temperamental, and may nip at times.

2. Ferrets as pets have many advantages, but these animals do have an attention span that is short. This means that complex tricks may not be picked up right away, and additional training may be needed.

Ferret Diet: Top 10 Foods

Ferret Diet1. Whole mice- A ferret diet that contains whole mice, whether live or frozen and then thawed, is one of the best diets possible. This food is identical to what your pet would eat in the wild, and contains plenty of protein.

2. Whole rats- Proper ferret care means a diet high in fat and protein but with few if any carbs or vegetables. Whole rats make the ideal prey, but make sure you buy animals that are safe and healthy, without any diseases or infections.

Ferret Training Tricks – How To Train Your Ferret?

Ferret TrainingIn the first years of domestication, ferret training usually consisted of learning how to hunt for humans. However, the role of the domestic ferret has changed over time. Now most human owners keep ferrets as pets, and thus the needs have changed.

The main reasons humans train ferrets now is to use their littler pan, or to curb nipping. Ferret training works on a system of positive encouragement, and meaningful negative reinforcement. It should be made clear that rarely to animals understand “punishment” as we do, so negative reinforcement must be done in a way that the animal understands.

Ferret Care Guide: Top 10 Things Ferret Owners Need To Know

Ferret CareIs a ferret right for you? Here are some ferret facts that you should know when considering a fuzzy rascal of your own.

Top 10 Things Ferret Owners Should Know:

1. Ferrets are Domestic Animals — While some claim that ferrets are still wild, this is simply incorrect. Humans have taken to ferret care for nearly 2,000 years. They are thoroughly domesticated and cannot survive well without human caregivers.